Holacracy Community of Practice Archive, 2015-2019 Community Holacracy Web Site

Gamifying Glassfrog

I just joined this forum today, and since I am ultra competitive- all I can think about is how I can elevate my community ranking. And I started thinking about how great this would be to help new organizations adopt Holacracy.  I'm wondering if it's in the glassfrog product roadmap to have a gamification feature to drive adoption and engagement with new users?

 

Also, want to open this discussion to see if any organizations have been successful in using gamification in any other ways to drive Holacracy adoption/ engagement in their organizations?  

46 Replies
Rebecca Brover
08/28/2015

Hi Leanne,

 

One way to add a gaming aspect to GF we are trying is setting up some achievements and giving each a point value. Each team member can earn all points so there is an aspect of competition as a group.

 

Some examples of achievements might be raising/integrating objection, first time serving as secretary/facilitator, first reference to the Constitution during a meeting, and referring to a role rather than a person.

 

I am excited to apply these in my own practice and look forward to other ideas.

Stephan Jenner
08/28/2015

I promote the whole Holacracy implementation as a game just like the famous book the great game of business. I love the idea of gamifying Glassfrog though you have my vote on that. My only caution is it should probably be about using GF for tracking projects and reviewing roles using the my authorities etc I would caution using tensions as a way as it may lead to forced tension or made up one and they really need to be grounded in reality.

 

And yes I'm getting a little competitive in this Hoop.la platform but probably just for now until the next skyrim add-on pack is released ;-)

Adrienne
08/29/2015

I hadn't thought of a point system per se, but I like that idea. The thought I had, that might work for my company at least, is a sort of scavenger hunt type of thing. We are looking into doing badges to show progress in other aspects of the company, and once you finished the scavenger hunt, you would earn your GlassFrog badge. Will have to think of another game type thing for the constitution, but we'll cross that bridge later. 

Bernard Marie Chiquet
08/29/2015

Great question... We set up metrics measuring the progress of each circle re self-sufficiency in Holacracy practice. These metrics are published transparently. What I have observed with some of our clients implementing Holacracy, is that this catalyse some fun & emulation between the circles. 

Stephan Jenner
08/29/2015

Bernard,

 

Would you be willing to share the metrics you track I think they would be most valuable but understand if you can't.

 

Furthermore I have developed a parsing system that parses the outputs from tactical meetings this then records the work into our ticket management system that then can be used to generate metrics on work performed by roles etc this assist the LL and role fillers in generating statistics that help see what engagement looks like

 

 

Bernard Marie Chiquet
08/29/2015

@Stephan

We've just shared them at the Holacracy Summer University held in Paris this month with other coaches. The ones we've shared as real ones from clients so we cannot leave them. Let me take a an action to build a template from those without any name.

Love already your parsing system. We don't have this kind of tools so we calculate metrics manually which is weird. GlassFrog should allow some key metrics generation re Holacracy practice like statistics as - number of roles per circle, number of tensions processed in governance per circle, etc... These are in our experience very useful data to monitor the Holacracy implementation.

 

DeAngelo
08/30/2015

I've been thinking about this (gamification of Holacracy) a bit and I'm thinking that this will be a key tool to help us ramp up maturity and excitement in our implementation. I don't know much about gamification and would love others with more experience chime in.  I did start to brainstorm a model that includes ways for people to build experience (XP) and earn achievements that can ultimately drive a leveling of the activity.  Here is my current list completely unrefined and grossly incomplete but it maybe it's useful:

 

Experience Achievements
ActivityXP NamePTSXP
Attending a tactical meeting  Attending the company's Holacracy 101 presentation  
Attending a governance meeting  Getting an account in GlassFrog  
Attending a tactical meeting as the secretary  Updating your profile for the first time  
Attending a governance meeting as the secretary  Getting added to your first role  
Facilitating a tactical meeting  Getting added to your second role  
Facilitating a governance meeting  Getting added to your fifth role  
Giving a presentation on Holacracy  Getting added to your 10th role  
Teaching a practitioner class  Getting added to your 25th role  
Contributing to the holacracy community site  Getting added to your 50th role  
Completing internal holacracy class <whatever>  Getting added to your 100th role  
   Completing the practitioner class  
   Passing the practitioner test  
   Completing the coaching class  
   Becoming a certified facilitator  
   Becoming a certified coach  
   Becoming a certified master coach  
   Getting assigned to a role in another circle  
   First tactical agenda item added and processed  
   First tension and proposal processed  
   First new role you created  
   First new accountability you created  
   First new accountability you created in a role you don't energize 
   First new circle created   
   First checklist item you added  
   First metric you added  
   First project added  
   First project completed  
   First valid object you raised and integrated  
   First invalid proposal you tested  
   Facilitate a meeting  
   Facilitated your 5th meeting  
   Facilitated your 10th meeting  
   Facilitated your 25th meeting  
   Facilitated your 50th meeting  
   Facilitated your 100th meeting  
   Secretaried your 5th meeting  
   Secretaried your 10th meeting  
   Secretaried your 25th meeting  
   Secretaried your 50th meeting  
   Secretaried your 100th meeting  
   Secretary a meeting  
   Became rep link  
   Became lead link  
   Became cross link  
Alexia Bowers
08/31/2015

Hi all! 

We do have a future feature for consideration for gamification of in GlassFrog. As GlassFrog Product Manager, I greatly appreciate all of the feedback and ideas posted here. I'm definitely watching this thread for ideas! Thank you!

ogergo
09/01/2015
I would emphasize the importance of supporting the tension2proposal efforts of Partners. If tensions are self reflected and proposals are elaborate that is both a personal self.management and a group self-governance achievement.
 
Originally Posted by Alexia Bowers:

Hi all! 

We do have a future feature for consideration for gamification of in GlassFrog. As GlassFrog Product Manager, I greatly appreciate all of the feedback and ideas posted here. I'm definitely watching this thread for ideas! Thank you!

 

ogergo
09/01/2015
Cool list Michael! Thanks for sharing!
 
Originally Posted by Michael DeAngelo:

I've been thinking about this (gamification of Holacracy) a bit and I'm thinking that this will be a key tool to help us ramp up maturity and excitement in our implementation. I don't know much about gamification and would love others with more experience chime in.  I did start to brainstorm a model that includes ways for people to build experience (XP) and earn achievements that can ultimately drive a leveling of the activity.  Here is my current list completely unrefined and grossly incomplete but it maybe it's useful:

 

Experience Achievements
ActivityXP NamePTSXP
Attending a tactical meeting  Attending the company's Holacracy 101 presentation  
Attending a governance meeting  Getting an account in GlassFrog  
Attending a tactical meeting as the secretary  Updating your profile for the first time  
Attending a governance meeting as the secretary  Getting added to your first role  
Facilitating a tactical meeting  Getting added to your second role  
Facilitating a governance meeting  Getting added to your fifth role  
Giving a presentation on Holacracy  Getting added to your 10th role  
Teaching a practitioner class  Getting added to your 25th role  
Contributing to the holacracy community site  Getting added to your 50th role  
Completing internal holacracy class <whatever>  Getting added to your 100th role  
   Completing the practitioner class  
   Passing the practitioner test  
   Completing the coaching class  
   Becoming a certified facilitator  
   Becoming a certified coach  
   Becoming a certified master coach  
   Getting assigned to a role in another circle  
   First tactical agenda item added and processed  
   First tension and proposal processed  
   First new role you created  
   First new accountability you created  
   First new accountability you created in a role you don't energize 
   First new circle created   
   First checklist item you added  
   First metric you added  
   First project added  
   First project completed  
   First valid object you raised and integrated  
   First invalid proposal you tested  
   Facilitate a meeting  
   Facilitated your 5th meeting  
   Facilitated your 10th meeting  
   Facilitated your 25th meeting  
   Facilitated your 50th meeting  
   Facilitated your 100th meeting  
   Secretaried your 5th meeting  
   Secretaried your 10th meeting  
   Secretaried your 25th meeting  
   Secretaried your 50th meeting  
   Secretaried your 100th meeting  
   Secretary a meeting  
   Became rep link  
   Became lead link  
   Became cross link  

 

Keith Jarvis
09/09/2015

Howdy and welcome, Leanne!  Great question... trying to imagine some game aspects to GlassFrog.

 

Folks, Leanne is a great sport who tolerated some fun-but-nasty role-playing from my snarky alter ego (which another teammate Melissa named "Kevin") - and yes our whole team was ultra-competitive, striving to 'win' the game in a competition that only existed in our minds.  And yes, we won, of course.  Our version of the simulation company Hygean at the Holacracy Practitioner training in Philadelphia created far more revenue than the other teams did, many who failed to meet payroll as they were locked up in process confusion.

 

HYGEAN4 RULES BABY!!

Keith Jarvis
09/09/2015
Michael -
 
I like the concept - but think that the idea of getting points for accepting roles could be a setup for failure on individual and team levels.  I think focusing on actions taken relative to constitution articles I and IV - re: duties and responsibilities - is much more likely to produce a positive result for the team and individual.
 
Also I don't know if you want to reward individuals for objecting, in order to try to get a valid objection integrated.  Maybe there should be nothing rewarded for items related to governance.  Let only real tensions drive your structure - not artificial or exaggerated tensions created out of the game construct.
 
Just my 2c
 
Originally Posted by Michael DeAngelo:

I've been thinking about this (gamification of Holacracy) a bit and I'm thinking that this will be a key tool to help us ramp up maturity and excitement in our implementation. I don't know much about gamification and would love others with more experience chime in.  I did start to brainstorm a model that includes ways for people to build experience (XP) and earn achievements that can ultimately drive a leveling of the activity.  Here is my current list completely unrefined and grossly incomplete but it maybe it's useful:

 

Experience Achievements
ActivityXP NamePTSXP
Attending a tactical meeting  Attending the company's Holacracy 101 presentation  
Attending a governance meeting  Getting an account in GlassFrog  
Attending a tactical meeting as the secretary  Updating your profile for the first time  
Attending a governance meeting as the secretary  Getting added to your first role  
Facilitating a tactical meeting  Getting added to your second role  
Facilitating a governance meeting  Getting added to your fifth role  
Giving a presentation on Holacracy  Getting added to your 10th role  
Teaching a practitioner class  Getting added to your 25th role  
Contributing to the holacracy community site  Getting added to your 50th role  
Completing internal holacracy class <whatever>  Getting added to your 100th role  
   Completing the practitioner class  
   Passing the practitioner test  
   Completing the coaching class  
   Becoming a certified facilitator  
   Becoming a certified coach  
   Becoming a certified master coach  
   Getting assigned to a role in another circle  
   First tactical agenda item added and processed  
   First tension and proposal processed  
   First new role you created  
   First new accountability you created  
   First new accountability you created in a role you don't energize 
   First new circle created   
   First checklist item you added  
   First metric you added  
   First project added  
   First project completed  
   First valid object you raised and integrated  
   First invalid proposal you tested  
   Facilitate a meeting  
   Facilitated your 5th meeting  
   Facilitated your 10th meeting  
   Facilitated your 25th meeting  
   Facilitated your 50th meeting  
   Facilitated your 100th meeting  
   Secretaried your 5th meeting  
   Secretaried your 10th meeting  
   Secretaried your 25th meeting  
   Secretaried your 50th meeting  
   Secretaried your 100th meeting  
   Secretary a meeting  
   Became rep link  
   Became lead link  
   Became cross link  

 

Egill Runar Vidarsson
10/06/2016

Greetings and hi everyone!

Reading this specific thread on gamifying glassfrog/Holacracy is especially inspiring to me.

The reason being, I’m currently doing my OCAD University MDes thesis project in their program “Digital Futures”. The combined objectives of the written thesis support paper and design output are to explore …

  • How might the practice of Holacracy, its benefits and challenges, affect organizational structure in regards to governance and decision-making within the private sector?
  • Can role-play – an act that I believe to be inherently paralleled in the practice of Holacracy and in many role-playing games such as “Dungeons and Dragons v3.5” – aid in introducing Holacracy to newcomers?

In essence, the “Holacracy as a Role-Playing Governance Game” thesis project – Dropbox link to more detailed proposal – is currently shaping up to be a multi-user web platform that introduces the framework and working principles of Holacracy through cooperative, participative play experience. Our cohort is currently in the constructivist, experimenting phase so while nothing is set in stone, the following is my action-plan for the moment.

Anytime and anywhere during the week-long OCAD graduation exhibit in April 2017, visitors can sign up to play using their own devices by initially choosing preset roles to steward in service of a collective purpose. Eventually, the participants themselves will push towards emergent, cooperative creation of additional roles and relevant artifacts. To turn visitors from spectators to participants, the output will reference the aesthetic setting of approaching an already in-play table-top board game by projecting the in-play participants’ progress and actions onto the top of a surface. (Dropbox link to my proposal presentation “poster” during the cohort’s colloquium last week).

I’m currently in ideation-mode regarding …

  • setting up a fictional organization with a shared purpose and initial roles. As an example, if you’ve played the immensely fun, co-op board game “Pandemic: Legacy”, I could imagine an example of such an organization being Pandemic Curers (sic) with the collective purpose “To develop cures and preventing outbreaks of diseases” and the initial roles of Medic, Researcher, Generalist, Dispatcher and Scientist).
    Regarding scope and number of individuals able to play, I’m unsure at this point. Blast Theory’s “Day of the Figurines” is really inspirational, somehow they have managed to run town simulations of up to 1,000 players.

  • In “Dungeons & Dragons”, the facilitator role is held within the Dungeon Master who also plans adventures (narrative situations that can produce important tensions to process in Governance and Tactical meetings) for the players’ fantasy roles. However, in a Holacracy-run organization the tensions are rather created by life when doing operational work in various roles while the facilitator guides the meeting processes. In Brian’s excellent “Holacracy: Governance Simulation”, the tensions were, I believe, necessarily predetermined and handed to players beforehand rather than being sensed when doing operational work (of which there isn’t any). So I have to figure how to solve this tension-issue, which might be to create an operational game of sorts that allows tensions to be created via gameplay which then another aspect of the game allows players to process their tensions via the key Holacracy processes of Governance and Tactical Meetings.

  • Since I’m developing the multi-user introductory execution utilizing Holacracy’s framework in an academic environment as a volunteer, and combining it thematically with other role-playing dynamics (Dungeons & Dragons, for example), I’m currently making sure with Rebecca Brover what I can develop using Holacracy’s framework and what I cannot. Under the licensing subpage on HolacracyOne.org, it states that “Anyone can freely use Holacracy in their organization. However if you would like to offer services to help other organizations adopt Holacracy, you will need to join one of our licensing programs.” This is where I get a bit confused for I am not specifically coaching any particular organization in Holacracy – only introducing its framework through public gameplay of sorts. Moreover, the same subpage states that as a practitioner (which I am, kind of, but more of a volunteer?) I can only deliver public presentations without simulation, which concerns me and is the reason I am seeking advice from the Holacracy community.

 

Sorry that this post turned out to be a bit lengthy, I get easily carried away with Holacracy and Teal-way of thinking. I sincerely believe that scalable, transparent and participatory org systems such as Holacracy, which fundamentally and systematically integrates diverse perspectives and distributes authority in service of a transparent and shared purpose, will move organizations towards being more agile, inclusive and empathetic.

I’m thankful for any feedback, advice and concerns offered. : )

Cheers,
– Egill R

 

Alexia Bowers
10/09/2016

Hi [@mention:528792613988609658]!

Personally, I'm a fan of Holacracy, Pandemic, and D&D, so that sounds cool to me! I think with a longer simulation, you can work in operational "work" of sorts so that tensions can arise - in the 5-day training, the simulation spans 2 or 3 days or something like that, so you probably have more opportunity in a longer game, or I would think it would work in a shorter game if you can give them things to do along with obstacles to that.

Egill Runar Vidarsson
10/11/2016

Hi [@mention:449833773730792463], thanks for your quick reply and suggestions regarding incorporating some kind of simulation of operational “work” that can be distributed to relevant roles and make tensions surface – see how “Captain Sonar” does this quite effectively, albeit in order to punish an opponent which is something I’d rather avoid. “Pandemic’s” focus on the Other being the obstacle of the game itself (curing diseases) is somewhat more peaceful, in my opinion.

Also, nice to see fellow Pandemic and D&D fans!

Can I ask, regarding your 5-day training that includes 2 – 3 days of simulation, do I understand correctly that the signed-up organization’s representative (ratifier?) brings in her knowledge of her own organization – e.g., its current structure and known tensions – which is then used for the simulation?

When I was wrapping my head around Holacracy over the summer, for a class at school, I ran a governance meeting elicitation exercise for newcomers wherein they were initially given named roles with no explicit accountabilities, purpose or domains at a fictional tech company. During this first 30min phase they were tasked to come up with 2 – 3 emergent tech ideas for any kind of industry for which they would deliver a 5min pitch at a fictional tech-fair hoping to attract investors.

During phase 2 the members were told they had successfully attracted an interested investor who wants to do a bit of match-making before jumping on board. This investor asks the members of the tech organization to meet for 60mins to devise how they would do the phase 1 exercise again knowing some tensions that might have had surfaced earlier. They would be asked to utilize a specific meeting-process manual: Holacracy governance meeting process.

The members elected two of them for the additional roles of facilitator and secretary who held the manual and went through each step reading out loud each page similar to when people are learning a board game together. This was my main hypothesis: can the rules of Holacracy be learned this way or not? (spoiler alert: it cannot, unsurprisingly, really).

Here’s a breakdown of the insights I gained from observing and getting feedback:

1. Check-in Round: worked like a charm.

2. Administrative Concerns: no issues.

3. Agenda Building …

  • Even though the manual given to them specifically states what a tension is in Holacracy terms, the member filling the participator role did not convey this particularly well so there were fuzzy distinctions of the term for each member. This proved to be pretty problematic, since the subsequent steps were skewed because of this main misunderstanding of tensions as opportunities for improvements.

4. Integrative Decision-Making …

  • Because members were collectively trying to understand and interpret the meeting process, where not even the facilitator was knowledgable beforehand, consensus and groupthink kept creeping in, for example making the proposer nervous of making proposals and trying to incorporate everyone’s Reactions in the Amend & Clarify round.
  • Facilitator was not ruthless enough when protecting the process (presumably because he was not familiar enough with the process) which let consensus and fake-quarterbacking creep in.
  • At some point, I couldn’t help myself and butted in a bit reminding the facilitator and secretary of the valid outputs of the governance, and the empty list of Governance Records. There the lightbulb went off and members started creating and amending roles very quickly and efficiently – albeit out of process.

5. Closing round: acted as a feedback session where participants shared their thoughts of the process in general.

Above notes confirmed some aspects, such as …

  • the importance of the facilitator being knowledgable beforehand and not learning the rules at the same time of other participants. How, do you think, does that play out in a board game / simulation? Moreover, if the game is digital, is Holacracy’s framework and the facilitator written into the program itself instead of a player stewarding that role? See this non-working prototype of such a chatbot-of-sorts I created as an exercise (pardon the messy layout).
  • participants saw real learning potential in repeated sessions and wanted to process the leftover agenda items even though the time was up.
  • were frustrated with the slow pace of learning a meeting process where phase 1 somehow incorporated more of a “true” emergent behaviour.
  • Long-term processes vs short-term processes contrasts.

I’ll be sharing my process as it comes a long when developing my project, specifically when figuring out context and opportunities for narrative interventions that enable tension-surfacing for the fictional organization (and hopefully overcoming my bias and assumptions that a simulation in a desk-job context would be too boring and not fantastical enough for user to engage in their own time).

Phew … [@mention:528792613988609658] a.k.a. “The Essay Writer” : O

Alexia Bowers
10/14/2016

Hi [@mention:528792613988609658],

In our public training, our simulation is all a fake org with fake roles and tensions. I don't have as much experience with the trainings, but Brian acts as the "world" which isn't a role per se, but more like the Dungeon Master. I think there's enough things that participants need to get done that tensions naturally arise from that, and I think that Brian throws other challenges/opportunities to the fake org (maybe sales opportunities or something), that add other tensions to arise.

Regarding the meeting exercise, I could imagine that it would be hard for a new Facilitator to stick to the rules and be "ruthless", since that is somewhat counter cultural. I could imagine a scenario where they were given a script that might help, and have the basic rules of facilitation spelled out beforehand in a clear way (e.g. crosstalk is never allowed and must be cut off immediately). I'm thinking of board games where there's effectively a role that guards something, like the banker in Monopoly or the person with the buzzer in Taboo. It is clear what your job is from the rules and that it is important to maintain those in gameplay no matter how silly it is to stand behind someone with a blue and pink buzzer. But, facilitation is complex enough that you might have to be able to play the game a few times to get the rules. Maybe there's a buildup/tutorial game you could play that would help introduce those rules, similar to the buildup of rules in Pandemic Legacy.

Egill Runar Vidarsson
10/15/2016

Hi [@mention:449833773730792463],

those are great insights and observations, thanks! The idea of a guarding-a-process role is especially interesting, it kinda reminds me of a season 2 episode of “How I met your mother” (spoiler-free, no worries) where two characters, Marshall and Barney, engaged each other in a Slap-Bet while the character of Lily got the role of the Slap-Bet Commissioner: monitoring the bet and any updates or violations and issuing penalties for such events. Maybe a bit too much power for a commissioner, but a keeper-of-rules role nonetheless. Being Marshall’s spouse also created some interesting conflicts between that role of Lily and the one of Slap-Bet Commissioner.

I’m currently in a bit of a dilemma of either …

  1. using an existing co-op style game as operational work to let tensions surface (including in-game narrative conflicts thrown the players’ way), and add to it Holacracy’s processes to solve the tensions; or …

  2. creating from scratch a co-op operational work style game for tensions to surface (including in-game narrative conflicts thrown the players’ way) with Holacracy’s processes addressing the tensions

I’m leaning towards the latter option for the former feels a bit shoehorn-y to me, and also a bit overwhelming in regards to the seemingly necessary task of upfronting all relevant functions, visual assets and elements which then might not be needed ultimately for the Holacracy RPG version of the game.

Alexia Bowers
10/16/2016

[@mention:528792613988609658]: I agree on option b - it seems easier to me as well to start from scratch.  I suppose it might be easier to do option a if you have a game that is close to what you want and that you can basically destroy - write on, cut out or paint the unnecessary elements,  etc. I guess with option a, I could see that previous familiarity with the original game being a positive or a negative.

Although, there are some pretty simple pencil and paper role playing systems out there that might have some of the mechanics you are looking for. I don't have enough breadth of experience to know for sure, but I've seen folks at gaming conventions that design their own games and bring them, so someone like that might have more ideas as to what it would take to create your own game or be willing to partner on it. 

Egill Runar Vidarsson
10/18/2016

[@mention:449833773730792463], great points – specifically this one: “there are some pretty simple pencil and paper role playing systems out there that might have some of the mechanics you are looking for,” since a Holacracy RPG game would definitely need the “Edit” option a lot rather than only rely on predetermined roles and their accountabilities throughout the game. Iterative design without an edit function is unable to work its magic.

I like the game mechanics of Pandemic (and Zombicide) which limits a player’s turn to …

  1. Using a total of 4 actions from a pool of multiple options which offers a bit more open-ended value to how the player decides to mix those actions together. That the player is encouraged to listen to other players’ advice but ultimately make the final decision is reminiscent of a Holacracy meeting process (nice, :fist-bump

  2. Drawing two Player cards which could be resources (City cards as knowledge to be used for Discovering Cures) or a narrative event card (Epidemic = Stuff comes in)

  3. Infecting Cities (narrative update = stuff comes in)

So, essentially, I’m looking at various fake org ideas that might have multiple relevant actions to choose from that sum up to a total of 4 actions, for example. At a, say, Publishing Firm the actions might be to Review AuthorsApprove WorkPromote Work and more actions that might need to be a bit more hi-level and not too granular, while narrative-inducing events (stuff comes in) might be disruptions to the publishing market, and maybe introduce D&D-chance die throws to cross-valuate whether a published work was a hit or not (based on chance and skill level of that particular role). 

On that note, I’m also wondering a suitable end for the experience since, as you probably know, the end of a D&D game is almost non-existent due to repeated game sessions and character development. It’s the classical destination-vs-journey debate, but an idea would be to limit the initial session to an objective / mission.

Thanks again for your ideas and inputs, [@mention:449833773730792463]!

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/09/2017

Hi everyone!

An update:
I’ve just completed a final hand-in of my MDes thesis document called “Learning Holacracy Fundamentals Through Play.” The paper documents a year-long design process that explored what Holacracy elements might be extracted and refitted for an introductory board game. The final (v.3.0) design output accompanying the thesis document culminated in “Little Bookcase Publications” – a co-operative board game for up to four players that introduces fundamentals of Holacracy.

Pasted below is the thesis abstract.

For those interested in learning more about the game and potentially wanting to further develop future versions with me, you can grab overview information along with a motion graphics video explaining the core mechanics of the game at:
http://www.egillrunar.com/litt...okcase-publications/

For those especially interested in the documentation of the process itself, the theoretical underpinnings behind the process and the overall motivation of creating the game, the following link takes you straight to the university’s repository:
http://openresearch.ocadu.ca/i...cracyThroughPlay.pdf

Thanks again to coaches and fellow attendees at the Holacracy Practitioner Training last year for their very helpful feedback on v.1.0. Sorry for the blurring of faces – you needed to be anonymised, according to the university. You know who you are

And further thanks to [@mention:449693036223847456] and [@mention:449833773730792463] for play-testing v.2.0 of the game early this year.

Looking forward to hear your thoughts and ideas for further work on an introductory co-op board game to Holacracy!

Ps. As the thesis document is around 150 pages, a “tl;dr” workaround might be to read the abstract and then the conclusion chapters in the thesis document.

Abstract:
“Little Bookcase Publications” is a four-player co-operative board game attempting to offer an experiential hands-on understanding of Holacracy fundamentals via contextualized simulation. Players act as partners at a small- scale publishing company and learn by role-playing Holacracy-inspired game- mechanics. In the literature review and primary qualitative data gathered via rapid ethnographic fieldwork it became apparent that organizations wanting to implement Holacracy can expect a steep, initial learning curve due to the rule- based – sometimes counter-intuitive – decision-making methods instilled in the method. Insights were gained from the field of organizational development, studies of role performance and play theory along with a design process which started as design-oriented research and then transitioned to research-oriented design. The final aim was to explore what fundamental processes and elements of Holacracy might be extracted to fit an introductory game to ease the learning of Holacracy.

Artem Serdyuk
05/10/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658]

Thank you for sharing your work! I think it's great both because it gamifies studying the rules, and also because it implements visual facilitation of the meetings.

May I play your game with my Holacracy study groups?

JeroenVermeer
05/10/2017

Wow, thanks for sharing your work. Looking forward to your further developments, and would certainly like to know if the game becomes available for the general public to purchase. Presently not in the position to offer any constructive help to you, but if so in the future, I will let you know! Meanwhile, keep up the good work!

Tyler Danke
05/10/2017

That looks absolutely incredible and I am anxiously awaiting playing the game.

Dien Kwik
05/10/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658], great work ����!

Can't wait to get my hands on one

 

 

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/11/2017

Thanks all, for your encouraging responses!

Currently, the prototype is quite an elaborate set-up of board pieces laser-cut from baltic plywood and close to eighty die-cut cards with rounded corners. That is to say, the exhibition setup-version of v.3.0 is not the easiest to mass-manufacture and distribute – at the moment.

My intent going forward is to team up, co-develop and distribute the game further with validation of inclusions made with certified Holacracy providers. In the meantime, the game’s elements might need to be put on US letter-sized / ISO A4 sheets for interested parties to print and cut out themselves. This might also help get more data on the game as it needs further play-testing.

[@mention:499799321313210508], [@mention:534281552617879089], [@mention:456167666726491228] and [@mention:450819477777465353]: is that something that you would be interested in?

Tyler Danke
05/11/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658] I would print it out and play it right now if I could I am not a certified provider however I wonder if my Holacracy bootstrapping experience might allow me to offer an interesting insight into the game. 

Artem Serdyuk
05/11/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658] yep I'm very interested! ))

I will have a chance to play with heads of companies adopting Holacracy in a week or two, so will be able to give you some feedback on the game mechanics.

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/11/2017

[@mention:456167666726491228] and [@mention:499799321313210508]: that’s great too hear! I know [@mention:452086181438015612] might be interested as well?

I believe I might be able to set up the game’s elements as printable PDF files over the weekend. I’ll get back to you.

Depending on various factors, there are a few things I’d like to address:

  • As there are quite a lot of cards used in the game, I’ll attempt at laying them out with crop marks as economically and functionally as I can per page. Please be careful if you’re cutting them out by hand.
  • The v.3.0 of the game has coloured card design. Depending on your printing budgets, if you choose to print black and white, I’m not sure what effect it will have on the play experience.
  • The card designs are double-sided with specific backs connected to specific fronts.
  • You need to acquire one six-sided die.
  • Playing a board game with thin paper elements like tokens and boards instead of cardboard is likely to be a bit weird and flimsy.
  • Each of the two board elements – “Governance” and “Operations” – are larger than a US letter / ISO A4 sized papers. I might need to have them spread over two or three pages that can then be assembled together via duct tape.
  • As with many co-operative board games, in “Little Bookcase Publications” there currently are a number of Objective cards which set up each play session. I’d recommend the “Easy Start” tutorial which might take approximately 15 minutes to complete, however, the current time estimate presumes a little bit of players’ knowledge of the game beforehand. With that said, it will be very interesting to see how you fare by only using the materials that I have provided (i.e., thesis document, rulebook and video overview).
  • As the game is created using Holacracy as a framework to learn Holacracy fundamentals, I follow and use the same license as the constitution has (see Creative Commons ShareAlike 4.0). If aiming to play-test the paper-version of “Little Bookcase Publications” with participants, please surface this information as much work has gone into creating the game.


Please check out both 4. Findings and 5. Conclusion sections in the thesis document for more details regarding v.3.0 of the game.

Andrea Faré
05/11/2017

Thanks [@mention:528792613988609658]  can't wait to have a look at it!

BTW: the link to the thesis is broken

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/11/2017
Andrea Faré posted:

Thanks [@mention:528792613988609658]  can't wait to have a look at it!

BTW: the link to the thesis is broken

Cheers, Andrea. Fixed the link to the thesis in the latest comment – more stuff above dated from 5/9/17 as well if you’re interested.

Dien Kwik
05/12/2017
Yes.. Definitely interested in the Print and Cut Yourself version Is there anything specific you still need to know or confirm from the game plays later ?
Isabelle Rappart
05/12/2017

Thanks [@mention:528792613988609658]  it looks great, I would really like to play and see if we can use it in our discovery sessions

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/12/2017

[@mention:450819477777465353]: my primary interest at this point is to observe whether players of “Little Bookcase Publications” v.3.0 start to understand the basic fundamentals of Holacracy via gameplay – i.e. how governance (roles, accountabilities) affects operations (projects, events, …) and vice versa. The secondary aim is to observe whether the game-mechanics are balanced enough to allow for a fun and engaging game. And … (see response to Isabelle Rappart, below)

[@mention:450678740272473756]: cheers, and great! If you are interested, please see above comments regarding that a PDF-DIY version might not necessarily have the same user experience to it as the exhibited version.

I will be working on setting things up over the weekend. As I’m a bit hesitant of using a shareable dropbox link, please comment below your email addresses (or send me direct message) and I’ll send you a download link to the PDF when I’m finished. That way I can attempt at keeping track of where things are going and who wants access.

In the meantime, please check out the 4. Findings and 5. Conclusion sections in the thesis document for more details regarding benefits and limitations of v.3.0 of the game, as well as Appendix E and Appendix F. This, I think, will help you to get acquainted with the game as “moderators” before running the game as it can be quite slow and sometimes frustrating if all players are learning a game at the same time.

For credit, I would greatly appreciate that you point your participants and colleagues to my portfolio (http://www.egillrunar.com/litt...okcase-publications/).

I’ll be in touch.

Dianne Dickerson
05/12/2017

Hi Egill, thanks for this very cool contribution. I would love to play as well! Here is a link for people to buy game pieces until you get into production: 

http://www.boardgamesmaker.com...8SaU_GTrXxoCr0Pw_wcB

Dianne Dickerson
05/13/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658], good luck with the layout! I would love to receive the PDF and would be am happy to supply feedback as I share the game with learners. Here's my email address:  d2@diannedickerson.com

Thanks!

Jeff Kreh
05/13/2017
Egill Runar Vidarsson posted:

[@mention:450819477777465353]: my primary interest at this point is to observe whether players of “Little Bookcase Publications” v.3.0 start to understand the basic fundamentals of Holacracy via gameplay – i.e. how governance (roles, accountabilities) affects operations (projects, events, …) and vice versa. The secondary aim is to observe whether the game-mechanics are balanced enough to allow for a fun and engaging game. And …

In the meantime, please check out the 4. Findings and 5. Conclusion sections in the thesis document for more details regarding benefits and limitations of v.3.0 of the game, as well as Appendix E and Appendix F. This, I think, will help you to get acquainted with the game as “moderators” before running the game as it can be quite slow and sometimes frustrating if all players are learning a game at the same time.

For credit, I would greatly appreciate that you point your participants and colleagues to my portfolio (http://www.egillrunar.com/litt...okcase-publications/).

I’ll be in touch.

[@mention:528792613988609658], thank you for bringing your project to this point. I looked at your webpage and found the explainer video especially helpful. I fill multiple roles with Likewise College, which focuses on bringing higher education to prison inmates and their families. Our prison students run their student body tactical and governance sessions very well, but could benefit from your game. We can test the game extensively during the Summer and Fall semesters and provide the feedback you request.

I'm interested in your temporary paper-printout version and would love to explore how some of our incarcerated students might make the specialty pieces and even gameboards using the prisons hobbycraft department.

Thoughts?

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/13/2017

[@mention:455604675931811081]: Cheers! and nice tip with the boardgamesmaker.com for people wanting to use stand-ins for some of the game pieces if they want. Also a very cool site that I’ll be adding to my prototyping toolset as their bulk orders seem to be very helpful.

[@mention:477139080146610445]: Cheers! And thanks for sharing your background regarding Likewise College – it is very inspiring work. If my contribution can help in any way, that is awesome! If you’d like to add your email in comment (or shoot me a direct message) I’ll add you to the Dropbox sharing pool that has access to a Dropbox link to the PDF/DIY version of the current game.

Those who have commented or sent me your email addresses: I’ll be sending you a download link to the PDF shortly. Following your play session(s) of the game, I would greatly appreciate that you fill out the accompanying Typeform-survey to help me gather information around the play-testing that is happening with this particular PDF version.

With that said, I sincerely hope that you will enjoy the game. I look forward to receive your survey responses as well as any pictures you might have captured and would like to share from your sessions.

– Egill R

EDIT #1 @ May 13 4:30pm (EDT): Sorry about the way Dropbox formats the invitation description. For easier reading, the PDF itself includes the same description.

Tom Mulder
05/14/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658]

Would love to have the PDF link so I can see the board and game. Have some people interested to learn this way.

Also open to provide you all the feedback you need based on their experiences.

Cheers and great result.

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/15/2017
Tom Mulder posted:

[@mention:528792613988609658]

Would love to have the PDF link so I can see the board and game. Have some people interested to learn this way.

Also open to provide you all the feedback you need based on their experiences.

Cheers and great result.

Cheers, [@mention:523162737680436711]!

As I’m a bit hesitant of using a shareable dropbox link, please comment below your email addresses (or send me direct message) and I’ll send you a download link to the PDF. That way I can attempt at keeping track of where things are going and who wants access.

Tom Mulder
05/15/2017

Thanks [@mention:528792613988609658]

mulder.tom@live.nl

 

 

 

Andrei Miron
05/16/2017

I'm also interested in your game [@mention:528792613988609658].

My email address is andrei.miron@gmail.com

 

Thanks

Vincent
05/17/2017

Hi [@mention:528792613988609658] , thanks for sharing this nice work. I'm interested too in the PDF version. My email adress is : v_lagalaye@yahoo.fr

Best regards !

 

Yiqing.He
05/20/2017

[@mention:528792613988609658] - so glad to see your work coming out now!  I used to be a heavy-duty in-house designer of serious games and gamification of learning, so I'd be very interested in playing the game and see if I could provide some feedback to you.  

Egill Runar Vidarsson
05/21/2017

Cheers, [@mention:546244779278352720]!

I’d love to pick your brain, for sure, as I experimented with a lot of this tricky balance between how much to include of Holacracy and still keep to a fun and challenging game (without players getting too bogged down).

In regards to emergent play, as the Holacracy practice allows practitioners to be very creative around processing their tensions, there was further tricky balancing between “letting people create stuff by themselves” vs. “draw predetermined cards and make creative co-op solutions around these.” The last section in the 3. Methodology chapter in the thesis document covers this process with tons of referrals for details in the appendices. 

When you’ve got the chance, drop me your email and I’ll send you a Dropbox link with accompanying Typeform survey to gather play-testing feedback.

Adrienne
06/07/2017

Hi Egil

I would totally be interested in trying a PDF version of your game. I play D&D weekly and Pandemic pretty regularly so it sounds right up my alley.

My email address is: adrienne@threestonehearth.com

Thanks! 

Daesun
09/29/2018

I, also, am a long time DnD/White Wolf RPG fan. I am looking to start an online RPG Game and Social Business Simulation using roleplaying and Holacracy.

As a way of working on my faciliator training to be prepared to take the assessment, I am working on (what I call) Level 0,1,2,3  Game Simulation using Holacracy. (You can see what I mean by level 0 which borrows Konrad's Holacracy Simulation Game and I made a few adjustments.)

Here is an overview of the RPG Gaming Idea.

If you really want learn more join and explore the Maitreya RPG game.

Also, I am using Konrad's idea of a scheduling spreadsheet (I hope he doesn't mind) when he did his simulation. 

Let me know what you guys think.

Thanks!