Holacracy Community of Practice Archive, 2015-2019 Community Holacracy Web Site

Employees

Hello, 
I read a lot about Holacracy the last time - and there is one question I have; my experiences as a leader is that there are always people who need more instructions than others; how does Holacracy deal with those employees?
for me, personally, it is a perfect management-system, but I know that there are other characters who are not able to work in this way; and for me this not only a disadvantage, although sometimes for me it was very exhausting to handle the team and different characters;

Maybe you have similar experiences...

5 Replies
Julia
01/09/2017

You are right that using Holacracy doesn't suddenly mean that everyone is self-sufficient and requires no input/guidance/support/mentoring/feedback from others.

We have done a couple of things:

  • Created roles of mentor/coach for certain individuals who are more junior
  • Created a role who is responsible for providing more formal support, feedback, development and performane management if someone is constantly under-performing and something mroe formal needs doing
  • Tried to create a culture where providing developmental feedback among peers is the norm through the use of regular anonymous peer feedback, staff surveys, an anonymous channel for staff to vent if they need to, and encouraging in the moment feedback

 

Some ideas anyway....

oskar
01/09/2017

People are different and their abilities and learning speed as well. It creates a lot of tension in you as Manager, if you have to compensate the difference, because you feel responsible for them. 

Holacracy gives everyone the possibility to regulate the learning speed by them-self(-> being self-responsible). If there is frequent need (=tension) for support, the organisation will create solutions. Like the good examples Julia mentioned.

And the best - no one has to be exhausted anymore :-)

Jeff Kreh
01/09/2017

If I understand you correctly, the tension is that some participants in the organization still act/think like employees who require management. Like [@mention:508806870940037068] points out, Holacracy gives possibility through empowerment (i.e., imposing self-responsibility). This is not for everyone and some will need to opt out in order to make way for incoming participants that can better align with the self-governance culture from their start. In time, I think the claim that practicing Holacracy helps transform those who are willing to submit to the call for self-leadership proves true. Still, for many humans, there is a huge gap between being led and having a self-leadership mentality.

One way we with Likewise address developing self-leaders is through guided reading and discussion group interactions. Some people (I'd say most) simply have no concept of self-leadership and need exposure to the rich history of literature that supports this contemporary self-governance movement. From our work with prison inmates and exposing them to the possibilities/blessings of self-governance/leadership, I'd say that your regular run-of-the-mill "employee" could stand to benefit from a similar community learning experience.

Koen Veltman
01/09/2017

Hi Elena, one way to bridge this gap (tension) is to make the role-ationship explicit. For example the social media role is responsible for "sending new customer feedback to the website developer". And the copywriter for "giving feedback to the Blogger on new articles written". 

In that way you make explicit that roles depend on each other. For expertise, capacity or experience. In quite a more natural way than employees used to depend on managers. 

Keith Jarvis
04/11/2017

Julia - would you kindly share a role definition for the second bullet in your response?

Julia posted:

You are right that using Holacracy doesn't suddenly mean that everyone is self-sufficient and requires no input/guidance/support/mentoring/feedback from others.

We have done a couple of things:

  • Created roles of mentor/coach for certain individuals who are more junior
  • Created a role who is responsible for providing more formal support, feedback, development and performane management if someone is constantly under-performing and something mroe formal needs doing
  • Tried to create a culture where providing developmental feedback among peers is the norm through the use of regular anonymous peer feedback, staff surveys, an anonymous channel for staff to vent if they need to, and encouraging in the moment feedback

 

Some ideas anyway....

Anyone else with a role doing similar Holacracy version of what in traditional hierarchy might be HR compliance? If so, will you kindly share your role definition as well?

Thanks much